LHCb’s Flavor Mystery Deepens

Title: Measurement of CP -averaged observables in the B0→ K∗0µ+µ− decay

Authors: LHCb Collaboration

Refference: https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.04831

In the Standard Model, matter is organized in 3 generations; 3 copies of the same family of particles but with sequentially heavier masses. Though the Standard Model can successfully describe this structure, it offers no insight into why nature should be this way. Many believe that a more fundamental theory of nature would better explain where this structure comes from. A natural way to look for clues to this deeper origin is to check whether these different ‘flavors’ of particles really behave in exactly the same ways, or if there are subtle differences that may hint at their origin.

The LHCb experiment is designed to probe these types of questions. And in recent years, they have seen a series of anomalies, tensions between data and Standard Model predictions, that may be indicating the presence of new particles which talk to the different generations. In the Standard Model, the different generations can only interact with each other through the W boson, which means that quarks with the same charge can only interact through more complicated processes like those described by ‘penguin diagrams’.

The so called ‘penguin diagrams’ describe how rare decays like bottom quark → strange quark can happen in the Standard Model. The name comes from both their shape and a famous bar bet. Who says physicists don’t have a sense of humor?

These interactions typically have quite small rates in the Standard Model, meaning that the rate of these processes can be quite sensitive to new particles, even if they are very heavy or interact very weakly with the SM ones. This means that studying these sort of flavor decays is a promising avenue to search for new physics.

In a press conference last month, LHCb unveiled a new measurement of the angular distribution of the rare B0→K*0μ+μ– decay. The interesting part of this process involves a b → s transition (a bottom quark decaying into a strange quark), where number of anomalies have been seen in recent years.

Feynman diagrams of the decay being studied. A B meson (composed of a bottom and a down quark) decays into a Kaon (composed of a strange quark and a down quark) and a pair of muons. Because this decay is very rare in the Standard Mode (left diagram) it could be a good place to look for the effects of new particles (right diagram). Diagrams taken from here

Rather just measuring the total rate of this decay, this analysis focuses on measuring the angular distribution of the decay products. They also perform this mesaurement in different bins of ‘q^2’, the dimuon pair’s invariant mass. These choices allow the measurement to be less sensitive to uncertainties in the Standard Model prediction due to difficult to compute hadronic effects. This also allows the possibility of better characterizing the nature of whatever particle may be causing a deviation.

The kinematics of decay are fully described by 3 angles between the final state particles and q^2. Based on knowing the spins and polarizations of each of the particles, they can fully describe the angular distributions in terms of 8 parameters. They also have to account for the angular distribution of background events, and distortions of the true angular distribution that are caused by the detector. Once all such effects are accounted for, they are able to fit the full angular distribution in each q^2 bin to extract the angular coefficients in that bin.

This measurement is an update to their 2015 result, now with twice as much data. The previous result saw an intriguing tension with the SM at the level of roughly 3 standard deviations. The new result agrees well with the previous one, and mildly increases the tension to the level of 3.4 standard deviations.

LHCb’s measurement of P’5, an observable describing one part of the angular distribution of the decay. The orange boxes show the SM prediction of this value and the red, blue and black point shows LHCb’s most recent measurement (a combination of its ‘Run 1’ measurement and the more recent 2016 data). The grey regions are excluded from the measurement because they have large backgrounds from the decays of other mesons.

This latest result is even more interesting given that LHCb has seen an anomaly in another measurement (the R_k anomaly) involving the same b → s transition. This had led some to speculate that both effects could be caused by a single new particle. The most popular idea is a so-called ‘leptoquark’ that only interacts with some of the flavors.

LHCb is already hard at work on updating this measurement with more recent data from 2017 and 2018, which should once again double the number of events. Updates to the R_k measurement with new data are also hotly anticipated. The Belle II experiment has also recent started taking data and should be able to perform similar measurements. So we will have to wait and see if this anomaly is just a statistical fluke, or our first window into physics beyond the Standard Model!

Read More:

Symmetry Magazine “The mystery of particle generations”

Cern Courier “Anomalies persist in flavour-changing B decays”

Lecture Notes “Introduction to Flavor Physcis”